Barlow

OR-25To hear the powerful howl of a wolf on Mount Hood is an event that many will diagnose as a sign of an ecosystem in true recovery. Many will also be chastised by the reappearance of a species unmatched in resilience and in it it’s long, intimate history with humanity, where subjugation and destruction have defined our role. Places like Wolf Camp Butte, Black Wolf Meadows, and Wolf Peak tell us that wolves have been part of the identity of Mt. Hood even in their absence.

Last year, wolf tracks were confirmed by wildlife agencies in the White River area of Mt. Hood National Forest for the first time in over fifty years. Scientists speculated that the wolf may have been traveling through, as no sightings or collar signals were documented. Early in 2015 OR-25, a lone 2-year old male wolf was confirmed roaming throughout the national forest and Warm Springs reservation. Wolves in Oregon are traveling hundreds of miles in search of new habitat that could support their return. Bark is humbled to have them trying out the forests we love. These wolves, seeking their rightful place in the landscape, represent why we fight to keep these forests standing.

The presence of dispersing wolves in the north Cascades begs the question - Is there suitable habitat to sustain a wolf population on Mt. Hood? With more than 4,000 miles of roads and logging occurring in thousands of acres of wildland every year, a paradigm shift will be necessary to keep wolves around.

OR-7The Forest Service’s outdated and politically girdled management plan fails to achieve ecological restoration, endangered species protection, watershed stability, or habitat recovery, instead prioritizing commercial logging.

Mt. Hood’s eco-tourism industry has an enormous opportunity, but it needs a partner in the U.S. Forest Service. Will it manage for people and wildlife? Or will it continue to manage for timber production?

The pending ODFW decision (November 9th, 2015) on whether to retain Endangered Species protections for wolves in Oregon and the upcoming revisions to the state's Wolf Conservation Management Plan and public lands management decisions present huge challenges as well as opportunities for the future of these animals. Sign up here to recieve notifications from ODFW about wolf sightings, policy, and public engagement opportunitites!

Contact us at (503) 331-0374 to get involved!
 

Project Status: 
Restoration
Habitat & Species
Habitat & Species: 

Kingdom:Animalia Phylum:Chordata Class:Mammalia Order:Carnivora Family:Canidae Subfamily:Caninae Tribe:Canini Genus:Canis Species:C. lupus

From 1900–1930, the gray wolf was virtually eliminated from the western USA and adjoining parts of Canada, because of intensive predator control programs aimed at eradicating the species.

Height: 26-32 inches at the shoulder
Length: 4.5-6.5 feet from nose to tail-tip
Weight: 55-130 lbs; Males are typically heavier and taller than the females.
Lifespan: 7-8 years in the wild. 12 years or more in remote or protected areas.
Mating Season: January or February.
Gestation: 63 days
Litter size: 4-7 pups

{Credit Defenders of Wildlife}

Prescriptions
Bark Comments: 

Wolves play a key role in keeping ecosystems healthy. They help keep deer and elk populations in check, which can benefit many other plant and animal species. The carcasses of their prey also help to redistribute nutrients and provide food for other wildlife species, like grizzly bears and scavengers. Scientists are just beginning to fully understand the positive ripple effects that wolves have on ecosystems.

Wolves eat ungulates, or large hoofed mammals, like elk, deer, moose and caribou, as well as beaver, rabbits and other small prey. Wolves are also scavengers and often eat animals that have died due to other causes.

Restrictions
Restrictions: 

Protection Status:

Endangered Species Act (Federal)

Alaska: Gray wolves are not listed as endangered in Alaska
Northern Rockies: Gray wolves in Idaho, Montana, and parts of Washington, Oregon and Utah were stripped of Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection in an unprecedented act by Congress in 2011. Gray wolves were delisted from the ESA by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in Wyoming in 2012.
Great Lakes: Gray wolves are not listed as endangered in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Gray wolves are listed as endangered west of hiways 385, 78, and 95 in Oregon.

Gray wolves are considered endangered in any other part of the continental United States.

Endangered Species Act (Oregon)

Gray wolves are protected by the Oregon Endangered Species act througout the state as of November 1, 2015. Though this listing is currently being challenged by ODFW.

Oregon Wolf Conservation Management Plan

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/Wolves/docs/Oregon_Wolf_Conservation_and_Mana...

The 3 Conifer sale logged in an inventoried roadless area adjacent to the Badger Creek Wilderness. It is the last salvage logging rider sale on Mt. Hood.

Project Status: 
Logged
General Information
District: 
Barlow
Total Acres: 
3,087.0
Watershed: 

Watershed: White River
Sub-Watersheds: Threemile Creek, Rock Creek, Gate Creek, Souva Creek

Habitat & Species
Habitat & Species: 
  • S&M Species: Great Grey Owl
  • T&E Species: NSO 1996? Bi-Op
Prescriptions
Total Acres: 
208.0
"Purpose & Need": 

The Forest Service states that the purpose of this project is to salvage disease or insect infected dead, damaged, or down trees before the usable wood fiber is lost to decay.

Bark Comments: 

1597 "Overstory" thin

Timber Sale Names: 
  • Con 1 (792 Acres, 24 MMBF, 11,628 CCF)
    Sold on 12/2/1996 to Bugaboo Timber Co.
    Status: Finished
  • Con 2 (407 Acres, 8592 CCF)
    Sold on 12/3/1996 to Bugaboo Timber Co.
    Status: Finished
  • Con 3 (677 Acres, 18,446 CCF)
    Sold on 12/10/1996 to Bugaboo Timber Co.
    Status: Finished
  • Con 4 (743 Acres, 14,629 CCF)
    Sold on 12/19/1996 to Bugaboo Timber Co.
    Status: Logging
  • Con 5 (468 Acres, 7,419 CCF)
    Sold on 12/10/1996 to Thomas Creek Lumber
    Status: Finished
Driving Directions: 

South of Badger Creek Wilderness, east of Rocky Butte, along roads 4810 and 4811

The Badger Creek Grazing Allotment was scheduled to go through the scoping process in January 2006. In 2007, the Forest Service re-authorized grazing on the allotment through a Categorical Exclusion. As of 2013, the allotment was still permitted to a rancher with access to the area, but who had been 'inactive for several years' according to Forest Service records.

Project Status: 
Grazing Allotment
General Information
District: 
Barlow Ranger District
Total Acres: 
20,340.0
Watershed: 

Badger Creek

Prescriptions
Bark Comments: 

The Badger Creek Grazing Allotment is scheduled to go through the scoping process in January 2006. We are currently awaiting a scoping notice and will then comment on the proposal. The Forest Service is proposing to re-authorize grazing on the allotment with no changes from current management. Updated 5/7/09

Before the Forest Service plans a commercial timber sale, they often go into the forest and do a precommercial thinning, removing the small trees and limbs. The scoping map showing 15,000 acres of precommercial thinning shows the Barlow 's precommercial thinning schedule for the next few years and is a good indication of where the Forest Service will be proposing logging projects down the road. The comment period for the scoping period is the public 's only chance to comment, because the proposal is being administered as a categorical exclusion (CE).

Project Status: 
Logged
General Information
District: 
Barlow Ranger District
Watershed: 

Badger Creek, White River, East Fork Hood River

Driving Directions: 

covers the Barlow District and some areas in the Hood River District of Mt. Hood

This sale has been a roller coaster. In response to our administrative appeal on January 20th 2010, the Forest Service withdrew its decision on this project. We celebrated the protecting of this area, home to beautiful eastside forests that became dear to many Barkers' hearts after siting a bear in the proposed sale during a Bark-About hike. But shortly after announcing our victory, in the spring of 2011 the Forest Service re-released the same Decision Notice for the sale, with the same 1629 acres and no changes to the project.

On July 15th Bark re-submitted an appeal on Bear Springs and were denied any of the site-specific changes that would have made the project better. For example, we asked that the Forest Service drop units that require building new roads. It seemed like a common sense approach, when the agency does not have the capacity to maintain 60% of its existing and deteriorating road system due to budget constratints on Mt Hood. Logging could begin on this sale as early as summer 2011. Please let us know if you witness any logging in the area. Call Bark at 503-331-0374 or email [email protected].

Project Status: 
In Progress
General Information
District: 
Barlow Ranger District
Total Acres: 
1,629.0
Watershed: 

White River

Driving Directions: 

The northern units can be accessed by FSR 48. The southern units can be reached by taking Highway 26 south to Highway 216 (turn left just after entering Warm Springs Reservation). Everything else is in between.

Billy Bob is a recent extension of the Miles Creek area. It is nearby the Eight Mile Meadow Timber Sale (a categorical exclusion ' sale). Billy Bob has begun with a collaborative group. After only two meetings it was revealed that the Forest Service has already made acreage decisions without a formal recommendation by the collaborative group. This revelation was made when a court ruling made the decision that all sales using 2004 Survey and Manage standards would need to be surveyed again using original and more stringent 2001 Survey and Manage standards. Billy Bob was listed on the contentious timber sales with a listed acreage allotment.The Sportsman 's Park project was similarly started as a collaborative group. Seen as a fairly insignificant project Sportsman 's Park was the only project that did not comment on in 2005. Without our influence and impact Sportsman 's Park grew to be a 900-acre categorical exclusion! We cannot let this same fate fall on Billy Bob.

Project Status: 
Logged
General Information
District: 
Barlow Ranger District
Total Acres: 
500.0
Watershed: 

Miles Creek

Driving Directions: 

Take I 84 East, south on 35, left onto 44, left on 4460. 4460 borders the eastern side of the sale.

The devil made them do it. Turning 700 acres of forest into 700 acres of sterile plantation.

Project Status: 
Logged
General Information
District: 
Barlow Ranger District
Total Acres: 
1,615.0
Watershed: 

White River

Habitat & Species
Habitat & Species: 

T&E Species: NSO Bi-OP?

Timber Sale Names: 

Path (773 Acres, 7.306 MMBF, 13202 CCF)
Sold on Feb-14-2002 to High Cascade Inc
Status: Finished
Wildfire (469 Acres, 5.058 MMBF, 10201 CCF)
Sold on Oct-27-1997 to Thomas Creek Lumber
Status: Finished
Diablo (373 Acres)
Sold on Oct-27-1997 to Thomas Creek Lumber
Status: Finished

Driving Directions: 

North of Bear Springs Ranger station and west of McCubbins Gulch

The Douglas Cabin project is within a Late-Successional Reserve and part of the Lewis and Clark Wilderness Proposal. At this point in time this project is postponed indefinitely.

Project Status: 
Canceled
General Information
District: 
Barlow Ranger District
Watershed: 

Badger Creek Watershed

Timber Sale Names: 

Douglas Cabin
Status: Pre-Scoping

Driving Directions: 

Immediately east of Badger Creek Wilderness inbetween Badger Creek and Little Badger Creek, surrounded on 3 sides by the Wilderness area.

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