wildfire

Riverside Fire Information Resources

The Clackamas River watershed is a favorite place for many Barkers — we have hiked, camped, fished, rafted, groundtruthed all over this region, from Eagle Creek to the Collawash. And now it has changed.  As the immediate threat to homes and communities from the Riverside Fire has subsided, we are trying to understand where it burned, how it burned, and what this will mean for the forest of the future.  Bark has been gathering information and resources to help answer these questions, and we'd like to share a few with you.  As we learn more, we'll share more! 

October Ecology Club: Smokey the Beaver!

Never has there been a more pressing time to discuss what opportunities humans have to better coexist with wildfire.

Bark Alert: Fire Ecology, Smoke Safety + Community Resources

Through the haze, we want to offer some clarity on what we know about the fire in Oregon’s forests and to share resources on what we can all do right away to protect ourselves and to help those with the greatest need right now.

Bark Alert: Learning Lessons from the Land

As I write, Mt. Hood National Forest is burning. Several new fires are burning through the Clackamas River Ranger District and information is changing by the minute. But, since August 17th, I’ve had my eyes on the White River Fire on the east side of Mt. Hood National Forest.

Fire + Merkley Summer 2019

August Ecology Club: What is the Future of Fire in the Cascades?

In August, we're excited to invite Andy McEvoy to present his research on forest fire in the Cascade Range. Andy is a Masters student at Portland State University in the Department of Environmental Science and Management. His research focuses on modeling future fire activity in west-side Cascade forests and he is eager for his work to help communities better plan for future conditions.

Lawmakers strike deal on wildfire spending

A long-term plan to pay for the rising cost of wildfires came back from the brink of collapse and was set to be included in an omnibus spending bill today, congressional and forest industry sources said.

Bark taught me the truth about fire

Last month, I attended Bark’s Staff Attorney Brenna’s presentation on Fire Policy. It was great!

After the Fire

This is so awesome when you think about it; the ways in which the creeks we frequent, the streamside forests and the salmon have evolved together in such intricate, amazing ways over the eons.

Ride On

While the Forest Service’s blank check approach to fire suppression is a problem that needs attention and creative solutions; none should include a mandate for increased, expedited logging on public lands.

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